New Work By Ian Berry At Genova Jeans

Last week the annual event Genova Jeans took place in Genoa, Italy to celebrate the city’s strong heritage with denim. This five days event was filled with conferences, animations, shows, expos, and many more must-sees.

A highlight was the new masterpiece by artist Ian Berry. He was asked to create a piece of art of Giuseppe Garibaldi, an Italian general and patriot that lived from 4 July 1807 – 2 June 1882. Garibaldi became an international figurehead for national independence and republican ideals and is considered by the twentieth-century historiography and popular culture as Italy’s greatest national hero. The outcome of Ian’s work is mind-blowing, as always.

ian berry garibaldi

The Piece Of Art By Ian Berry

Ian Berry has been delving into the history of denim for his latest work, in fact, so far back it can be said the history before jeans. Ian’s Garibaldi in jeans, denim on denim, measures 106 x 77 x 6 cm, and is placed at the Museo del Risorgimento in Genoa city. This museum was the birthplace of Giuseppe Mazzini whose efforts, like that of Garibaldi, helped bring about the independent and unified Italy.

ian berry garibaldi

ian berry garibaldi

ian berry garibaldi

Based On The Painting By Gerolamo Induno

The new work of Ian Berry is based on the painting by Gerolamo Induno’s Garibaldi a Marsala (11 May 1860), oil on canvas, 1861, in the Museo Nazionale del Risorgimento Italiano in Turin, who supported this portrait. In the painting, like other iconographic testimonies dedicated to Garibaldi and the red shirts, including those in the Museo del Risorgimento in Genoa, the protagonist wears trousers made of the typical blue fabric, whose Genoese origins are recognized.

ian berry garibaldi

Giuseppe Garibaldi and his liberation army land at Marsala, Sicily, on 11 May 1860.

The Blue Of Genoa

It must be remembered that Giuseppe Garibaldi was originally a Ligurian sea captain who dressed, as his colleagues did, in trousers made of the tough blue cloth named ‘bleu de Gênes’ (the blue of Genoa) thus the appellation, blue jeans. While we all wear jeans today and may not find it surprising, it was another 100 years before Levi Strauss, the founder of Levi’s, got a patent for adding a rivet with tailor Jacob Davis to indigo dyed work overalls and helped create what we now know as jeans, with the style and material forming differences, but the name remained.

ian berry garibaldi

Ian Berry at Museo del Risorgimento with the work in denim of Garibaldi.

www.ianberry.org

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Written by Wouter Munnichs
I'm the founder of Long John. Next to running this daily magazine, I'm working as a freelance denim specialist for the industry. Titled as 'Denim Influencer 2020' by Rivet 50. Celebrating my 10th anniversary with Long John this year.